Diving In – The Promise of Social Marketing for Storm Water Education

 

Kapalua Bay on Maui

Kapalua Bay on Maui. The West Maui Kumuwai campaign uses social marketing to protect a sensitive watershed.

Individuals have a direct influence on storm water quality in their communities, and regulators strongly emphasize public education and involvement campaigns in municipal storm water management programs. But how can leaders convince residents to pick up after pets, reduce lawn pesticide use, and wash cars without getting soapy water in storm drains? And how can they discourage commercial and industrial workers from dumping contaminated liquids down storm drains behind shops, and to use drip pans to keep oil off pavement? These behavior changes would have a direct positive effect on the coastal and inland water resources we enjoy.

In traditional environmental education campaigns, the message is often delivered through newsletters, brochures, public service announcements, and social media. Some effort may be made to reach a specific audience, but the focus is producing a good quality educational tool. The hope is that having a good message and delivering it well will make people listen, learn and act.

But experience in educational campaign history indicates otherwise. Simply handing someone a pamphlet does not mean that a person will act on that information.

Enter social marketing. Social marketing integrates marketing concepts and tools from social psychology to influence behaviors that benefit individuals and communities for the greater social good.  While social marketing campaigns sometimes employ social media, the two are not the same. Social marketing can use a variety of tools to influence behaviors. First used in the public health realm, the practice focuses on a specific community. Research and surveys identify real or perceived barriers to change, and campaigns are designed to overcome those barriers and reward desired behaviors.

A great example of social marketing in action is the West Maui Kumuwai (WMK) campaign in a sensitive watershed on Maui. WMK is a non-profit that shines a spotlight on the actions of everyday people to promote ocean health. Through community surveys, WMK identified landscaping activities as a community concern relative to storm water pollution. WMK’s Reef-Friendly Landscaper campaign invites landscapers and gardeners to “Take the Pledge” by agreeing to a set of ocean-friendly landscaping activities. WMK then promotes those companies on its website and through social media, to keep these companies engaged and committed.

If you’ve heard of other successful social marketing campaigns related to storm water education, please let us know with a comment.

For more information about storm water services for municipalities, construction, and industry, contact Janice Marsters at janice.marsters@hartcrowser.com.

Anchoring the World’s Longest Floating Bridge

SR520 Bridge

Photo: WSDOT

You’re at the bottom of Lake Washington, 200 feet underwater. It’s flat as a pancake here, but the first 50 feet of soil is diatomaceous silt and clay, which is unspeakably unstable. Think microscopic glass Christmas tree ornaments with the consistency of chocolate mousse. Below that is 50 feet of very-soft clay (zero blowcount, to those in-the-know).

Try, just try, to anchor the new SR 520 Bridge in this chocolate mousse (remember, it’s a floating bridge that can’t be left to drift off to Renton or points unknown). And just for good measure, make each of the 58 anchors able to resist a horizontal load of 600 tons—four times what was needed for the old bridge.

Figure out that you’ll need three types of anchors. In areas along the side slopes, where the water is shallower and has competent soil, use a gravity anchor, but call it a box of rocks amongst your workmates.  Build it like a heavily reinforced concrete egg carton with only four compartments. Joke about the kind of eggs that would fit into a 40 foot by 40 foot by 23 foot carton.  Build them on a barge at the concrete plant in Kenmore at the north end of the lake.  Make them so heavy that that the only derrick large enough to lift one is too big to fit through the Ballard Locks. Tow the gravity anchors through the Ballard locks, though they barely fit, while the public looks on in astonishment.

Gravity anchor

Gravity Anchor on its way to the SR 520 Bridge site. Photo: Kiewit

Flood the 440-ton floating boxes with water to make them sink. Lower them to the lake-bottom and place them on a leveled-out gravel pad. Fill each of them with 1,700 tons of rock to make them heavy enough for lateral frictional resistance, or so they won’t budge.

Don’t stop there. Use a second type of anchor, a drilled shaft, along the shoreline where the lake is shallow enough that the box of rocks would have caused havoc as a navigational hazard. Make them ten feet in diameter and 100 feet tall, not as tall as the original Godzilla, but close enough.

Drilled Shaft

Ten-story-deep drilled shaft anchor. Image: KPFF Consulting Engineers

Then, use fluke anchors, the most technically challenging anchor, for the majority of the project. Make these fluke anchors from reinforced concrete plates three feet by 35 feet wide by 26 feet tall. Cast a steel tetrapod into the side so that the anchor cables can be attached to the I-bar at the end of the tetrapod. Explain that a “tetrapod” is a four-sided shape with triangular faces (not to be confused with a four-limbed vertebrate).

Fluke Anchor

Fluke anchor being jetted into the bottom of Lake Washington. Image: KPFF Consulting Engineers

Place the fluke anchors in a steel frame equipped with water jet tubes to drive them into the mud. Because the mud is chocolate mousse, place mounds of rock above and beside the fluke anchors. And then more rock. And then more rock. Good, that’s enough.

Now, celebrate. The Washington State Department of Transportation’s grand opening of the longest floating bridge in the world will be April 2 and 3, 2016. You can run, bike, or possibly meander across the bridge. Hopefully there will be food. You’re hungry after all that work.

Hart Crowser was the geotechnical engineer-of-record for the anchors for the new SR 520 Bridge. The design-build contractor was a joint venture of Kiewit/General/Manson. The structural engineer was KPFF Consulting Engineers.

Need more information? Contact Garry Horvitz, PE, LEG, at garry.horvitz@hartcrowser.com

Fluke anchors on barge

Fluke anchors on barge.

Why an Earthquake Warning System Should Not Be a Priority In The Pacific Northwest

Earthquake_damage_Cadillac_Hotel,_2001_SmallerThe newest and hottest topics when it comes to disaster discussions in Oregon and Washington, as well as on the national level, are an earthquake warning system and earthquake prediction possibilities. They are the new obsession that has come on the heels of the New Yorker articles this summer. While we don’t object to advancing both of these methods to better warn of impending quakes and hopefully save lives, we do think that the discussion is premature, especially here in the northwest.

The first reason is that an earthquake warning system like that in Japan has to be implemented only with a comprehensive, aggressive, and continuous public education program. Without a full understanding of what you should do when your phone emits an ear piercing shriek warning of impending shaking, we risk even greater panic and possibly more casualties. Running out of buildings with unreinforced masonry or weak facades just before the shaking could put people at more risk of falling hazards outside of the buildings. It could also cause major traffic hazards as drivers try desperately to get across or get off bridges and overpasses. Unless we develop a much better awareness of what the public should do when they receive the warning, it may cause more problems than it solves.

But the real issue is that these technologies are acting as the bright shiny objects that are distracting all of us, from the public to the president, from the real issue: our infrastructure is in dire need of upgrades not only to prevent casualties, but also to encourage long term recovery.  We doubt 30 seconds of warning will seem as beneficial when the public doesn’t have wastewater for one to three years.  Further, a warning system that stops surgery or an elevator is not as important as making sure that the hospital or building itself is designed to withstand shaking. Especially in Oregon and Washington, all of our energy and funds need to be focused first on comprehensive and intelligent infrastructure improvements that increase our community resilience. And that needs to happen as quickly as possible. We implore you not to follow the flashing light! Urge our government to focus on the real issues, and encourage your colleagues and neighbors to personally prepare.

For more information contact Allison Pyrch at (360) 816-7398 or Allison.pyrch@hartcrowser.com

Shaken and Stirred: Northwest Earthquake and Tsunami

Washington 9.0 earthquake--Are you ready? Oregon 9.0 Earthquake--Are you ready?Suddenly the Pacific Northwest is on the national stage for its earthquake and tsunami vulnerability, thanks to a New Yorker article. “The Really Big One,” by Kathryn Schulz, has triggered attention from dozens of local papers and news sites. Yet even before the New Yorker shook the Northwest (pun intended), Oregon Public Broadcasting had been featuring Hart Crowser engineer Allison Pyrch in its “Unprepared” series, to alert the region to the impending disaster in hopes that we will get prepared.

Also, Allison recently gave a presentation for the Lake Oswego Sustainability Network: “Surviving a 9.0, Lessons Learned from Japan and Beyond.” If you are involved in emergency management or just plain interested in massive disasters and their aftermaths, settle in for some powerful visuals and easy-to-follow explanations about earthquakes in Japan and Chile, how the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami will happen in the Pacific Northwest, and what you can to do to be resilient.

Watch the whole “Surviving a 9.0” video to get unusual insight into what’s ahead, or if you’re pressed for time, skip to one of these minute points:

  • 9:00 Jan Castle introduces Allison Pyrch 10:56 Allison Pyrch’s presentation begins with how the Pacific Northwest 9.0 earthquake will happen
  • 14:25 Comparing the Japan and Chile quakes “It didn’t stop shaking for a day”
  • 21:45 Fire damage/natural gas 22:30 Water, wastewater, and electrical systems; liquid fuel; natural gas
  • 24:25 Lifelines/infrastructure/airports “PDX will not be up and running”
  • 28:35 Port damage/economics
  • 31:45 How prepared is the Pacific Northwest? When will it happen? “We are 9 ½ months pregnant”
  • 35:00 What will it look like?
  • 37:32 What you can do
  • 40:30 What businesses can do
  • 42:11 Can you be sustainable without being resilient?
  • 43:33 What about a resiliency rating system similar to LEED?
  • 53:30 Will utilities, transportation, hospitals be useable after the 9.0? “We’re toast”
  • 1:01:30 End of Allison’s presentation; additional information from Jan Castle on how to prepare
  • 1:19:19 How sustainability measures in your home lead to resiliency

Oregon Public Broadcasting’s Resiliency Blitz Starts January 26

Allison Pyrch of Hart Crowser

Allison Pyrch at a base isolated hospital near Ishinomaki, Japan, talking to Ed Jahn, OPB Producer. With Jay Wilson, Clackamas County Emergency Manager (left) and the hospital engineer. Listen January 26-28 on OPB radio’s Morning Edition between 7 and 9 am and at www.OPBnews.org.

For the last year, Allison Pyrch, a geotechnical engineer with Hart Crowser in Portland, Oregon has been the American Society of Civil Engineers representative to support Oregon Public Broadcasting in the preparation of a 2015 “media blitz” highlighting Oregon’s dire need for improved seismic resiliency.

Allison, the section secretary and a member of the ASCE Technical Committee on Lifeline Earthquake Engineering, travelled to Japan with the OPB Field Guide crew in September to highlight the damage and engineering successes that were observed after the 2011 subduction zone earthquake and tsunami.

The Japan footage, as well as footage from within Oregon, will be used throughout the year to bring awareness to the need for seismic resiliency here at home. The work will culminate with an hour-long documentary in October 2015.

The first segment of coverage will air January 26-28 on OPB radio’s morning Edition between 7 and 9 am can be found now on the OPB website here and here. The series will discuss critical structures in tsunami zones. The January 28th segment will feature Allison and cover how Japan constructs base isolated hospitals that are ready for business immediately after a major seismic event. Tune in and listen!

Digital Coast Act Introduced to Aid Communities with Coastal Planning and Disaster Response

Digital Coast Website Snapshot

Those of you involved with GIS or coastal mapping may be familiar with NOAA’s Digital Coast Project, which consists of a free, online database of the most up-to-date coastal data throughout the U.S. Established in 2007, this project not only provides essential data, but also the tools and training coastal communities need to respond to emergencies and make sound planning decisions. Due, in part, to its collaborative nature and broad datasets ranging from land use to aquatic habitat to socioeconomics, the Digital Coast has quickly become one of the most widely used management resources in the coastal management community.

Accurate and up-to-date coastal information is becoming increasingly important in the U.S. Coastal watershed counties were home to nearly 164 million Americans in 2010, approximately 52% of the U.S. population. This number is expected to increase by more than 15 million by 2020. These counties also contribute over 58% ($8.3 trillion) of our gross domestic product. As vital as our nation’s coasts are to the local and national economy, they are equally as vulnerable. In the Pacific Northwest, growing demand for coastal development, combined with an increase in natural hazards such as sea-level rise, extreme weather, and flooding events, will continue to exert significant pressures on coastal communities. Storm damage from coastal flooding and erosion result in response costs, lost productivity, and lowered economic productivity that we all pay for one way or another. The Digital Coast Program provides accurate data and integrated information that enables coastal communities to adapt to changing environmental conditions and protect their local economies.

In September 2014, U.S. Senator Tammy Baldwin, with support from Senator Maria Cantwell (WA) and others, introduced the Digital Coast Act of 2014. This legislation authorizes further development of the Digital Coast Project by increasing access to uniform, up-to-date data, identifying data gaps, and ensuring that coastal communities get the data they need to respond to emergencies, plan for economic development, and protect shoreline resources. The bill would provide funding for a national mapping effort of coastal waters that includes improved data on coastal elevations, land use/land cover, structures, habitat data, and aerial imagery, all of which could be of great benefit to Puget Sound and the Pacific Northwest. This legislation has been assigned to a congressional committee but it is unclear if and when it will be enacted. However, many coastal planners and scientists view the Digital Coast Act as critical legislation that is needed to help ensure the protection of coastal resources and communities in the Pacific Northwest and throughout the nation.

More information on NOAA’s Digital Coast Project or pending legislation to enact the Digital Coast Act

That’s Not Real Blood And Gore

MeganandWard

Ward McDonald and Megan Higgins portray accident victims in a wilderness training class

Environmental scientists and engineers often go deep into the wilderness to sample surface water, sediment, soil, and groundwater.  Some sites may take hours to hike into, and others may only be accessible by helicopter.  Taking samples is not highly dangerous in itself, but a medical emergency in a remote and unpredictable environment requires a different level of first aid training.

With this in mind, some of our staff recently took an intensive two-day wilderness first aid introduction to remote medicine.  The course was led by paramedic and Mount Rainer guide, Carrie Parker of Remote Medical International.  The material was practical and hands-on: patient assessment, traumatic injuries, medical emergencies, environmental emergencies, lifting and moving patients, and medical kits.

Realistic practice helped participants learn to handle serious situations when they are an hour or more from professional help.  We hope they’ll never have to use these skills, but they’ll be ready if they do.

Raising Puppies for Guide Dogs for the Blind

Guide Dog Puppy

Paige, a Labrador retriever puppy from Guide Dogs for the Blind, and raiser Lou Travis.

Lou Travis, a Project Administrator in Hart Crowser’s Portland office, didn’t know what she was getting herself into when she signed up to be a Puppy Raiser for Guide Dogs for the Blind (GDB). She soon found out. Before getting the puppy, she completed an application, read a detailed manual, got a home visit, attended lots of little pup meetings and outings, and puppy sat. She also got permission from property managers and fellow employees to bring a puppy to work.

Finally, a cute little ball of fur named Paige became Lou’s new constant companion. The next 14 months were a constant stream of, “sit, wait, come, on your bed, down, stay, do your business, nice, kennel, stand, okay, let’s go, good girl, I’m sorry she’s working now but thank you for asking if you can pet her.”

Being a puppy raiser takes work and a great deal of patience, dedication, and love. There’s no pay (except puppy kisses). When the job is done it’s like sending a kid off to college. The adorable little ball of love has stolen your heart, but it’s time to send it off to someone who needs help getting somewhere safely, whether it’s by foot, bus, train, or plane.

Once the dog’s formal training is complete, GDB matches the dog with a handler to begin the final step of the training. Dogs that complete the training become working guides for blind or sight-impaired people, and career-changed dogs become therapy dogs or loving, well-trained pets. A select few become breeders (Paige is being considered for this).

It’s hard to give the pup back at the end. But according to Lou, “It’s an amazing and worthwhile experience that I’ll do again…absolutely! Try it…it will change your life!”

Volunteer Frenzy!

Food Lifeline volunteers

Yes, that’s a heart-shaped potato our team found in this huge bin.

Six Hart Crowser staffers volunteered their time at Food Lifeline last week to kick off this year’s participation in Food Frenzy. Food Frenzy is a team-building competition between hundreds of socially responsible companies working to help end hunger for children in Western Washington.

This particular session involved bagging potatoes from huge crates into 5-pound bags. We earned points for the Hart Crowser Food Frenzy team and, in just two hours, helped Food Lifeline to provide 4,154 meals.

Volunteering is just one of many ways to earn points for Food Frenzy. Check it out here. The main event takes place during two weeks in July, and it’s a lot of fun. If your company wants to compete, contact Food Lifeline.

Food Frenzy Raises Money and Food for Children

Image

Donations for Food Lifeline

Hart Crowser staff recently took part in Food Lifeline’s Food Frenzy competition, a creative competition between local businesses to raise funds and food for Food Lifeline to end hunger for children in western Washington. The “frenzied activities” extended over a couple weeks in July, and Hart Crowser came in fourth in the Design and Construction company category.

We also had a friendly competition within Hart Crowser to spur on the action. We created four teams to compete against each other: Team Geotech, Team Environmental, Team Edmonds, and Team Admin. 

In addition to food donations, Hart Crowser sponsored events to raise money, including a silent auction, breakfast buffet, book sale, and bake sale.  Each of the four teams created theme baskets for the auction and individuals or small groups came up with other creative items to make or obtain.  Maybe the most unique auction item was an offer by one employee to shave his beard that raised $230 alone.  We thank Geiger (promotional products) for their donation of a number of items for the auction.

Our teams raised $4,590, and donated 1,326 pounds of food.

And the winner?  Food Lifeline, which accumulated 22,000 food items and raised $490,000!